Butternut Instant Coffee TV Commercial: “Subliminal” ~ 1962 Animated Cartoon

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Butternut Instant Coffee TV Commercial: "Subliminal" ~ 1962 Animated Cartoon

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Commercial mocking the idea of subliminal advertising, produced by Stan Freberg.

Originally a public domain film from the Library of Congress Prelinger Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied.
The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stan_Freberg
Wikipedia license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

Stan Freberg (born Stanley Friberg; August 7, 1926 – April 7, 2015) was an American author, actor, recording artist, voice artist, comedian, radio personality, puppeteer and advertising creative director, whose career began in 1943. He remained active in the industry into his late 80s, more than 70 years after entering it.

His best-known works include “St. George and the Dragonet”, Stan Freberg Presents the United States of America, his role on the television series Time for Beany, and a number of classic television commercials…

Television

Beginning in 1949, Freberg and Butler provided voices and were the puppeteers for Bob Clampett’s puppet series, Time for Beany, a triple Emmy Award winner (1950, 1951, 1953). whch was broadcast live on KTLA in Los Angeles, and distributed nationwide via kinescope by the Paramount Television Network, the pioneering children’s TV show garnered considerable acclaim. Among its fans was Albert Einstein, who once reportedly interrupted a high-level conference by announcing, “You will have to excuse me, gentlemen. It is time for Beany.”

Freberg made television guest appearances on The Ed Sullivan Show and other TV variety shows, usually with Orville the Moon Man, his puppet from outer space; he reached through the bottom of Orville’s flying saucer to control the puppet’s movements and turned away from the camera when he delivered Orville’s lines.
Freberg had his own ABC special, Stan Freberg Presents the Chun King Chow Mein Hour: Salute to the Chinese New Year (February 4, 1962),[citation needed] but he garnered more laughs when he was a guest on late night talk shows.

A piece from Freberg’s show was used frequently on Offshore Radio in the UK in the 60’s: “You may not find us on your TV”.[citation needed] Other on-screen television roles included The Monkees (1966) and The Girl from U.N.C.L.E. (1967). Federal Budget Review was a 1982 PBS television special lampooning the federal government. In 1996, he portrayed the continuing character of Mr. Parkin on Roseanne, and both Freberg and his son had roles in the short-lived Weird Al Show in 1997.

Advertising

When Freberg introduced satire to the field of advertising, he revolutionized the industry, influencing staid ad agencies to imitate Freberg by injecting humor into their previously dead-serious commercials. Freberg’s long list of successful ad campaigns includes:

Butternut coffee: A nine-minute musical, “Omaha!” which actually found success outside advertising as a musical production in the city of Omaha. It tells the story of a young man, “Eustace K. Butternut”, who was stolen by Gypsies at an early age and, as an adult, returns to his own city, finding the residents under a spell that keeps them singing and raising their arms in the air. He frees them by saying his last name backwards (“Tunrettub”), but he immediately orders them to raise their hands back up again, taking everything the citizens have.

Contadina tomato paste: “Who put eight great tomatoes in that little bitty can?”

Jeno’s pizza rolls: A parody of the Lark cigarettes commercial…

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